Skip to content

Seasoned Translators: What They Should Consistently Do

November 15, 2017

There is always the first time for everything. It’s true in translation too.

When I first entered this translation industry on a freelance basis, I have this fear of failing to succeed, let alone survive. However, gaining information and knowledge from reliable sources and acquiring thorough, more than adequate understanding of translation business intricacies have greatly helped me survive and thrive in this growing business.

With the unstoppable incoming wave of novice translators, more seasoned translators must creatively and professionally find ways to stay in high demand and at a high or, at least, standard tariff while consistently maintaining high quality.

Novice translators increasingly tend to bid and accept low tariff in order to get their first jobs. This might be acceptable in their first few years of working as freelance translators. However, they must not be carried away too long with the consistently low tariff throughout their career. Once they reach a more steady level, they should also increase their tariff to a more decent one. Low tariff almost all the time relates to low quality.

It is indeed true that there is always an editor as part of quality control process. Nevertheless, a novice translator must not blindly rely on their editor and submit poor quality translation. Agencies must not practice similar reliance. In any circumstances, any translators must submit their high quality translations: no grammatical mistakes, no spelling errors, no referential errors, and no major errors.

Yes, translators are indeed humans who are prone to make mistakes. Hence, second and third eyes, the so-called editors or proofreaders or reviewers, are no doubt needed to ensure faultless translations. An editor must avoid making preferential edits. Instead, when the translation is close to flawless, they should make encouraging comments. A widespread opinion among editors is they fear of being falsely assumed not to work when they do not make any revisions to a translation. Instead, editors must bear in mind that when they do make some edits to such flawlessness, the edits must aim to increase the translation’s readability, rather than trying hard to make up nonexistent mistakes.

With the correct, shared understanding of the flow of translation work and the functions of each role, either as a translator, editor, or agency, translation industry will gain an increasing reputation in the eyes of other industries and may eventually take the same position as other more established industries. When translation business actors respect each other, we are paving the way to a more established, reputable translation business.

From → Translation

8 Comments
  1. Alex permalink

    I’m now not sure where you are getting your info, however great topic. I needs to spend a while finding out much more or figuring out more. Thanks for great info I was on the lookout for this info for my mission.

    • All my writing is based on my experience and reading of many sources. We all need time to learn. Don’t worry. Take your time. Hope you have a good mission and it will be successful.

  2. Alex permalink

    Wow, amazing weblog layout! How lengthy have you been blogging for? you make blogging look easy. The overall look of your website is fantastic, as well as the content!

    • Hi, Alex. Thanks for visiting my blog and for your kind comment. I’ve been blogging since 2012 and through much learning of course. And I’ll always improve my blog. Hope the contents of my writing will be useful for my followers and readers. Cheers!

  3. Alex permalink

    I appreciate, lead to I found exactly what I used to be having a look for. You’ve ended my 4 day long hunt! God Bless you man. Have a nice day. Bye

  4. Melody Cohen permalink

    You can definitely see your enthusiasm within the work you write. The sector hopes for even more passionate writers like you who are not afraid to mention how they believe. Always go after your heart.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: